Skip to main content

You can't take it with you!

You can't take it with you!

Ford Lacy and Cece Smith Plan Their Community Legacy

"YOU CAN’T TAKE IT WITH YOU!" is the first thing Ford Lacy said when we asked what spurred him and his wife, Cece Smith, to plan in advance how they would give to charity through their wills.

As an attorney and venture capitalist, they were romanced by the idea of spending down their net worth while living, but practically, that’s pretty difficult to do.
 

“It’s a fun idea to be able to die with a negative net worth, but that’s hard to plan on,” says Ford Lacy. “Assuming there is something left, we thought working with Communities Foundation of Texas would be a good way to address that issue."

As Cece and Ford started their estate planning process, they came to Communities Foundation of Texas for assistance with their planned giving, and during the process, they decided to open a donor-advised fund to structure their giving now as well.


“You have to support your charitable interests or the groups doing the work won’t be there,” says Ford. “The things we support are the things we are interested in and are involved in—for example, Dallas Symphony Orchestra, Dallas Opera, Dallas Museum of Art and UT Southwestern. We don’t usually give abstract gifts; usually we’ve made a real investment through participation and volunteering first.”

“Cece and Ford are incredibly intentional in their strategy,” says Susan Swan Smith, chief giving day officer at Communities Foundation of Texas. “They’re sophisticated in their questions and expectations. It’s been an honor to work actively with them now as well as to help them plan their philanthropic legacy.”

For assistance in developing a giving strategy that is consistent with your charitable goals, contact Geri Jacobs, director of charitable gift planning at 214.750.4255 or gjacobs@cftexas.org.
Michelle Hall honors her mother's passion

Michelle Hall honors her mother's passion

Hall uses her donor-advised fund to honor her mother


“My mother was a tireless champion of education and community improvement,” says Michelle.  “She has always been an inspiration for me and now for my four daughters as well.”It’s hard to overstate the effect Margarita De Nocochea had on Calexico, California.

Pet Adoption Advocate

Pet Adoption Advocate

Kit and her daughter, Gloria, opened the Saving Hope Fund at Communities Foundation of Texas after finding and adopting an abandoned and severely abused dog on her ranch outside of Fort Worth 


Kit and her daughter, Gloria, opened the Saving Hope Fund at Communities Foundation of Texas after finding and adopting an abandoned and severely abused dog on her ranch outside of Fort Worth, Texas. Kit Moncrief always had a soft spot for animals. The socialite and animal lover adopted her fair share of rescue animals in the past, so when she heard that an abused dog turned up on her family’s ranch, she knew she had to take action.

Setting an Example

Setting an Example

Generational Hands-on Service from the Scripps Family


“I ENJOY BEING VERY HANDS-ON,” says Debbie Scripps. “At Children’s Medical Center, I’ve loved doing a range of things from working in the gift shop to decorating the hospital to spending time with the kids.”Debbie and Ric Scripps, CFT fund holders, understand the value of giving back to their community. As their children have grown into adults, Ric and Debbie have seen them embrace their philanthropic side as well.

Tomorrow our future will be brighter

Tomorrow our future will be brighter

Help and hope for expecting mothers


Thanks to the passion of donors like the Nicol family, this little girl was born a happy and healthy baby. The Life Shines Bright Pregnancy Program, an initiative of the Methodist Health System, provides resources for at-risk expectant mothers to help reduce the risk of preterm birth.

Pearl C. Anderson: Her Dream Lives On

Pearl C. Anderson: Her Dream Lives On

The charitable fund Pearl C. Anderson created in 1955 still supports the community today


When CFT began 60 years ago in 1953, it was known as the Dallas Community Chest Trust Fund. The first major gift to the Dallas Community Chest Trust Fund was in 1955 from Pearl C. Anderson. She was an African- American grocer and widow of a local physician. Her gift was a future interest to the trust in a prime piece of land in downtown Dallas valued at $325,000.