Skip to main content

Pet Adoption Advocate

Pet Adoption Advocate

Kit and her daughter, Gloria, opened the Saving Hope Fund at Communities Foundation of Texas after finding and adopting an abandoned and severely abused dog on her ranch outside of Fort Worth 

Kit and her daughter, Gloria, opened the Saving Hope Fund at Communities Foundation of Texas after finding and adopting an abandoned and severely abused dog on her ranch outside of Fort Worth, Texas. Kit Moncrief always had a soft spot for animals. The socialite and animal lover adopted her fair share of rescue animals in the past, so when she heard that an abused dog turned up on her family’s ranch, she knew she had to take action. Police captured a tortured pug, starving and suffering from stab wounds, a snout banded with electrical tape, and a tongue so wounded it was becoming detached. Pictures show the pug bleeding from her sides at her rescue. Clinging to life, the pug recovered despite losing some of her tongue.

Kit’s heart went out to the starving pug, as it does for all abused animals she sees. She adopted the sweet animal and gave her an appropriate name: Hope.

But that wasn’t the end of the story. Together with Kelsey Patterson and other supporters, Kit started a foundation, Saving Hope, a non-profit with the goal of ending animal euthanasia, sprung up to give hope to all abused and homeless animals. Kit spoke with us about her love for Hope and the purpose of her foundation.

When did you first learn of Hope? The day she was found on the ranch, the sheriff called my husband and told him about it. We heard from the people working on the ranch about her. I, of course, was horrified.

You have adopted other animals in the past. Why do you choose adoption? We’ve adopted dogs, a mustang, four burros, really anything that needs a home. You’re saving a life. These animals are so appreciative. They know that they’ve been saved. I’ve had other animals that ‘ve bought from breeders, and they’re wonderful too. I just love all animals. They are very special and they’re appreciative. They give you so much love.

How is the search going to find Hope’s abuser? They haven’t found anyone yet. I hope somebody will turn them in. Before, we‘ve had two horses, three cows and a bull shot on our ranch. There was a reward put up, they caught him, and he’s in jail now. Hopefully this person will be caught and prosecuted.

Kelsey Patterson is working with you to start Saving Hope, a foundation to help animals. What made you want to start a foundation? We just saw the need. The city is so overwhelmed with the overpopulation [of animals], and they can only do so much. The Humane Society can only do so much. We just want to help. I hate the fact that there are all these animals being euthanized that could be wonderful pets and add to so many people’s lives. The fact that people don’t spay and neuter animals, or they can’t afford them and turn them out, makes it a vicious cycle. If we could stop the cycle or do more education, we can turn it around for these adoptable animals.

What are the goals of Saving Hope? It’s to fund things that fall through the cracks. The humane society does a wonderful job and our city does a wonderful job, but we would like to do things that they can’t do. Maybe try to get free spay and neuter clinics or portable services that go to areas where people can’t bring their dogs in. There’s such a need. We sure want to include education to stop abuse.

What do you hope people take away from Hope’s story? Most importantly, nobody should even abuse animals. I hope that people will adopt, spay, neuter, and love their animals because they’ll receive so much more back. They’re such a blessing to my life and everybody else’s life. I don’t know what I would do without animals.

Article originally printed in Fort Worth, Texas Magazine, September 2012 Issue

A Passion for Opportunity

A Passion for Opportunity

Kristofer Robinson Scholarship Fund at CFT provides educational opportunities for paraplegic and quadriplegic students in Texas


Established after a tragic automobile accident that left the late Kristofer Robinson paralyzed from the neck down, the Kristofer Robinson Scholarship Fund at CFT was created to support the education of paraplegic or quadriplegic individuals. One recent scholarship recipient of the Kristofer Robinson Scholarship Fund is Nathan McClintock.

A Passion for Education

A Passion for Education

Om & Shanti Funds at CFT provides scholarships and opportunities to students


For the Sethis, giving back is a family affair. Parvesh and Jeet Sethi have two charitable funds at CFT: the Om & Shanti Scholarship Fund and the Om & Shanti Fund, a donor-advised fund. Both their family fund and their scholarship fund are centered around providing educational opportunities for students.

A Passion for Community

A Passion for Community

Mary Anne Sammons Cree leaves legacy of giving through CFT's Live Oak Legacy Society


Mary Anne Sammons Cree had a passion for our North Texas community. She spent her life giving back in support of the causes that mattered most to her—the performing and visual arts, museums, education, and nature.

A Passion for the Arts

A Passion for the Arts

Cece Smith Lacy and Ford Lacy fund new works from arts organizations through their fund at CFT


As Cece Smith Lacy and Ford Lacy began their estate planning process, they came to Communities Foundation of Texas for assistance with their planned giving. During their research, they learned about donor-advised funds and decided to open the Cece Smith Lacy and John Ford Lacy Fund at CFT to support their giving during their lifetime.

A Passion for Giving

A Passion for Giving

CFT’s NTX Giving Day becomes an annual celebration for the Ngo family


Joylynn Huynh-Ngo’s children haven’t quite made it out of elementary school, but they know a thing or two about whipping up batches of boba tea, cookies, and lemonade, and sharing their creations with and for the community.

Inclusion Matters

Inclusion Matters

CFT launches #IAMPEARL FUND in honor of Pearl C. Anderson


CFT’s first six-figure gift came from an African American woman named Pearl C. Anderson. Pearl grew up in rural Louisiana during the days of racial segregation and was prohibited from going to school until the age of 12, when a school for Black children was finally built a few miles from her home.