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Strikeouts Save Lives

Strikeouts Save Lives

Clayton Kershaw Uses CFT Fund to Raise Money for African Children

Dallas native and Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Clayton Kershaw fused his natural baseball ability with helping children in need last season when he began pledging $100 for every strikeout to support children in Africa.

“I had the opportunity to go to Africa with my wife Ellen,” says Clayton. “My eyes were opened to the difficulties surrounding these children every day: risk of disease, lack of proper nutrition and dreadful living conditions.” Last year, Ellen and Clayton Kershaw started Kershaw’s Challenge to raise funds to build Hope’s Home—an orphanage for vulnerable children, many of whom are affected by HIV.

“When we started the challenge, we didn’t know where to turn or who could help us,” says Ann Higginbottom, director of Kershaw’s Challenge. “CFT answered all our questions and put us at ease. We are so thankful to be under the umbrella of CFT, whose staff is ensuring that we ‘dot our i’s and cross our t’s.’ It’s the perfect answer for us.”

As Kershaw’s Challenge gained momentum, so did Clayton’s career. In 2011, Clayton led the National League with 248 strikeouts, qualifying for the “Triple Crown” of pitching (lowest ERA, most wins and most strikeouts). He also won the National League Cy Young Award, which is given annually to the best pitcher.

“It is truly humbling that at the moment we began the challenge, everything fell into place, on and off the field,” says Ellen. “We can’t wait to see what the 2012 season has to hold for Kershaw’s Challenge. We hope it’s the best season yet.”

A Passion for Opportunity

A Passion for Opportunity

Kristofer Robinson Scholarship Fund at CFT provides educational opportunities for paraplegic and quadriplegic students in Texas


Established after a tragic automobile accident that left the late Kristofer Robinson paralyzed from the neck down, the Kristofer Robinson Scholarship Fund at CFT was created to support the education of paraplegic or quadriplegic individuals. One recent scholarship recipient of the Kristofer Robinson Scholarship Fund is Nathan McClintock.

A Passion for Education

A Passion for Education

Om & Shanti Funds at CFT provides scholarships and opportunities to students


For the Sethis, giving back is a family affair. Parvesh and Jeet Sethi have two charitable funds at CFT: the Om & Shanti Scholarship Fund and the Om & Shanti Fund, a donor-advised fund. Both their family fund and their scholarship fund are centered around providing educational opportunities for students.

A Passion for Community

A Passion for Community

Mary Anne Sammons Cree leaves legacy of giving through CFT's Live Oak Legacy Society


Mary Anne Sammons Cree had a passion for our North Texas community. She spent her life giving back in support of the causes that mattered most to her—the performing and visual arts, museums, education, and nature.

A Passion for the Arts

A Passion for the Arts

Cece Smith Lacy and Ford Lacy fund new works from arts organizations through their fund at CFT


As Cece Smith Lacy and Ford Lacy began their estate planning process, they came to Communities Foundation of Texas for assistance with their planned giving. During their research, they learned about donor-advised funds and decided to open the Cece Smith Lacy and John Ford Lacy Fund at CFT to support their giving during their lifetime.

A Passion for Giving

A Passion for Giving

CFT’s NTX Giving Day becomes an annual celebration for the Ngo family


Joylynn Huynh-Ngo’s children haven’t quite made it out of elementary school, but they know a thing or two about whipping up batches of boba tea, cookies, and lemonade, and sharing their creations with and for the community.

Inclusion Matters

Inclusion Matters

CFT launches #IAMPEARL FUND in honor of Pearl C. Anderson


CFT’s first six-figure gift came from an African American woman named Pearl C. Anderson. Pearl grew up in rural Louisiana during the days of racial segregation and was prohibited from going to school until the age of 12, when a school for Black children was finally built a few miles from her home.